Teaching The Value Of Money

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IMG_5417They say “Money can’t buy you happiness.” This may be true, but it sure can buy you a lot of things that make you happy. People love money. Even at an early age the love of money begins. My daughter may not comprehend the value of money, but she sure does know that she likes it. Whenever there is spare change lying around, her face lights up & she hoards it for her piggy bank.

Mai is in her “I want that” phase. We can barely leave the house without it. At the grocery store I hear it echoing down every aisle. “I want the Goldfish crackers.” “I want the funny juice box.” Alright, but you’re buying today. It is funny, she never does.

Children’s brands are clever. They advertise everywhere. Luckily, we do not watch much television that contains commercials, but those marketers find a way to sneak in a ad anywhere. While reading to Mai ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’, she noticed the back book jacket with the author’s other books on it.

“Mama, I want the pig with the pancake.”

“I’m sorry honey. We don’t have that book.”

“Mama, you go to the store & get the pig with the pancake?”

Siiiiiiiigh! Thank goodness for the library.

I can remember at a young age my mother telling me “Money doesn’t grow on trees.” My smart ass remark back was always “Yes it does. Money is made out of paper & paper grows on trees.” Oh how, I wish I could go back in time & smack the crap out of myself.

We want Mai to grow up understanding the value of money and how to spend responsibly, but for now we will just start with her being able to differentiate between those coins that she loves to hoard. Here is an easy coin sorting activity.

What you will need:

2 paper plates

A couple of markers



Assorted change

Directions: Money is dirty, so be sure to clean your change first. On one plate, slice 4 slits on the back just long enough to fit each coin. Use a marker & write the value of each coin to the side of the slit. On the other side of the slit, attach the coin with glue or with tape. Write the coin name underneath. Place the other plate down normally. Staple or glue the paper plate with the coins to the other one so that the coins are on top. It will form a little container to insert & catch the coins in.

IMG_5412 IMG_5410 IMG_5413 IMG_5414 IMG_5420 CoinSorting.jpg

“Mama, now we put them in the piggy bank?” The kid is no dummy.

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  1. Loved Mai’s comment at the end and yes so true about having to teach the value of money, because same here my girls think that they will get whatever their hearts desire. Crazy, but true!

  2. Reblogged this on Alternate Tutelage and commented:
    Teaching money to kids is one of the most difficult things to do and yet if you start at a young age, you’re setting your child up for the development of all sorts of good habits. Here’s a really simple yet effective activity to give you that edge!

  3. This is a great idea!! My 3 year old son loves putting his change away in his batman bank. We are teaching him that if he saves up his $ he can be able to buy things that he likes. The other day we went to a coinstar machine so he change it. He had $6! He was so excited. I took him to the $1 store and he picked out 3 toys for himself and a Hello Kitty necklace for his cousin, because her birthday was that weekend. I loved seeing him hand the $ to the cashier and walking out the store with a big smile on his face :).

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